News/Features

Life Lessons

Life Lessons

USA Today, Hispanic Living
Fall 2017
In the 25 years since Hispanic-serving institutions (HSIs) officially were recognized under the Higher Education Act, the number of colleges and universities with this designation has quadrupled. A higher graduation rate among Latinos, welcoming environments and programs targeted specifically toward helping Latinos succeed have contributed to the increase.

Staying the Course

Staying the Course

USA Today, Hispanic Living
Fall 2016
While the number of Latinos enrolled at U.S. colleges has increased for years, they continue to lag other groups when it comes to graduation rates. Simply getting Latinos into college hasn’t been enough to ensure their success.

A Role for Recess

A Role for Recess

USA Today, Back to School
Fall 2016
On any given afternoon in schoolyards across the country, children can be seen and heard running and playing during a time many adults recall fondly as recess. But this treasured school-day respite is a scenario that has been all but eradicated at a growing number of schools for reasons ranging from academic to social.

Making College a Family Affair

Making College a Family Affair

USA Today, Hispanic Living
Fall 2015
Latino enrollment in American colleges and universities is at its highest rate and growing. More than 3 million Hispanics attend college in the U.S. and Puerto Rico, comprising about 18 percent of all students versus only 10 percent a decade ago. Still, many Latinos face significant barriers to obtaining a higher education.

Acute Care

Acute Care

USA Today, Hispanic Living
Fall 2014

The nation has faced a shortage of Latino doctors for decades, but with the population growing exponentially and greater numbers of Latinos getting health care through the Affordable Care Act, that shortfall is certain to be felt more acutely than ever in the coming years.

A Monumental Achievement

A Monumental Achievement

Williams Alumni Review
Fall 2013
Life went on as usual after World War II for Charles Parkhurst ’35 and S. Lane Faison Jr. ’29. That’s the way it was for so many men of their generation: They took their anger, fears and the burden of their experiences, folded them up and stored them away. There were no pictures of war comrades in the offices of these two Williams art history legends, nor were there any medals or memorabilia on the walls of their homes. They might have answered questions about the war if asked, but they rarely discussed it unprompted. The only indication of their service was something they both wore proudly on their suit lapels, if the occasion warranted it: a thin, red ribbon that signified their induction as Chevaliers of the Legion of Honor, the highest award bestowed by France.

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